Posts in: Diabetes

Karmic Beauty: Going Pixie with Locks of Love

Posted in: Cancer, Family, Diabetes // 0 Comments

locksoflove
By Lindsay Tharp

I have always looked enviously at women with short hair. I would always think to myself, how did they get the guts to chop it? What made them take the plunge? I’m not just talking about a short bob, I’m talking about the women who rock the short pixie cuts. I think there is something so brave about short hair. When you go that short you have nothing to hide behind. Almost all women I meet or see with very short hair have a certain confidence surrounding them. Don’t get me wrong I love long hair, but there is something to be admired about women short hair. It’s like they are saying, “I know I’m beautiful, I am comfortable in my own skin.”
Here is a quote that sums it up nicely-

“With short hair you begin to crave pearl necklaces, long earrings, and a variety of sunglasses. Short hair removes obvious femininity and replaces it with style.” – Joan Juliet Buck for American Vogue, c.1988

This quote along with knowing my 14 inches of hair would go to someone who needed it, was my final push. So I made my appointment at Ten Salon with the lovely Dana Starr.
For those of you who aren’t familiar with Locks of Love here is a little more about them:
Locks of Love is a public non-profit organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children in the United States and Canada under age 21 suffering from long-term medical hair loss from any diagnosis. www.locksoflove.org

GUIDELINES FOR ACCEPTABLE DONATIONS
• Hair that is colored or permed is acceptable.
• Hair cut years ago is usable if it has been stored in a ponytail or braid.
• Hair that has been bleached (usually this refers to highlighted hair) is not usable. If unsure, ask your stylist. We are not able to accept bleached hair due to a chemical reaction that occurs during the manufacturing process. **If the hair was bleached years ago and has completely grown out it is fine to donate.
• Hair that is swept off of the floor is not usable because it is not bundled in a ponytail or braid.
• Hair that is shaved off and not in a ponytail or braid is not usable. If shaving your head, first divide hair into multiple ponytails to cut off.
• We cannot accept dreadlocks. Our manufacturer is not able to use them in our children’s hairpieces. We also cannot accept wigs, falls, hair extensions or synthetic hair.
• Layered hair is acceptable if the longest layer is 10 inches.
• Layered hair may be divided into multiple ponytails.
• Curly hair may be pulled straight to measure the minimum 10 inches.
• 10 inches measured tip to tip is the minimum length needed for a hairpiece.

Locks of Love was the motivating factor that allowed me to muster the courage to cut my hair. I thought to myself, even if I don’t like how I look with short hair at least I know someone will be getting a nice long wig. Not only do I feel great about donating my hair, but I am also really enjoying the new do!

Diabetes Myths

Posted in: Diabetes // 1994 Comments


By Shannon Pulusan

Diabetes isn’t an airborne disease. It’s not contagious through physical contact. Each bite of your favorite chocolate bar isn’t necessarily a bite closer to diabetes. Even those who never indulge in sweets, who maintain a healthy weight, who exercise three times a week can genetically carry diabetes.

With approximately 8.3% of the U.S. population diagnosed with diabetes, it is important to get our facts straight about the disease. To avoid misconceptions, here are some diabetes myths debunked.

  1. Eating too much sugar causes diabetes.
    Often times, people associate your favorite sweets to diabetes. Ever hear someone says “Don’t buy that candy! It’s a bag of diabetes!”? Though too much of anything is a dangerous habit, diabetes isn’t simply caused by one indulgence. Type I diabetes stems from genetics and environmental factors while Type II occurs when cells are resistant to insulin. To avoid Type II diabetes, be sure to limit your sweet indulgences and maintain healthy eating and exercise.
  2. Only diabetics require insulin.
    Insulin is necessary for diabetics and non-diabetics alike to maintain the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas enabling sugar to enter the cells for energy. While healthy individuals produce the right amount of insulin required for the body, diabetics either produce too little or none at all. Patients use insulin pumps or insulin injections to get the ample amount of this essential hormone.
    While we’re on the topic, insulin is not a cure for diabetes.
  3. Diabetes isn’t a serious life-threatening disease.
    We wish this was a true statement. However, according to the American Diabetes Association, “diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.” In fact, diabetes is strongly linked to stroke and heart disease.
    To avoid these complications and statistics, diabetics are advised to manage a routine of healthy dieting and exercise.
  4. You can outgrow diabetes.
    Unfortunately, diabetes does not simply disappear. In Type I, the immune system destroys insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Patients must depend on insulin to facilitate pancreatic functions. Though Type II diabetes is manageable with healthy eating and exercise, patients will always have a tendency towards having high blood sugar levels.
  5. Only people who are overweight or obese are diagnosed with diabetes.
    Unfortunately, diabetes does not simply disappear. In Type I, the immune system destroys insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Patients must depend on insulin to facilitate pancreatic functions. Though Type II diabetes is manageable with healthy eating and exercise, patients will always have a tendency towards having high blood sugar levels.

To find out the reality of diabetes beyond common myths, visit American Diabetes Association – Diabetes Myths .

Photo provided by FreeDigitalPhotos.net .

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